The Federal Practice Group Blog

Domestic Violence in the Military: More Common than Expected

Posted By fedpractice || 27-Sep-2012

Did you know that in one year alone, more than 18,000 incidents of domestic violence and spousal abuse were reported to the military services? More than 10,000 of these cases were substantiated. About 62 percent of all defendants were active duty military members, while about 38 percent were the spouse of an active duty military member. 66 percent of all victims were female, while 34 percent were male. In the military, domestic homicides are also frequently reported. From 1995 to 2001, 54 homicides occurred in the Navy and Marine Cops. 131 homicides were reported in the Army in this span of time, and 32 occurred in the Air Force.

A 2003 study reported that about 30 percent of all active duty military women have been abused by an intimate partner in their lifetime. 21.6 percent of these women say that they were abused while on active duty. If you are a military member and have been accused of domestic violence, you case can be handled two ways. The military justice system may choose to investigate and try you for the domestic violence charges. You may also have to work with the Family Advocacy System. These are two separate systems that are not connected but both have the same goal: to protect military families from abuse.

The family advocacy program will deal with treatments, classes, and prevention of future incidents of domestic violence. The military justice system will deal with your sentencing and carry out your punishments. When it comes to domestic violence in the military, a lot is at stake. Not only do members risk the dangers of punishment and criminal prosecution, but they may also lose their jobs in the process. If you have been tried for domestic violence in a military court, it’s essential that you get a military criminal defense lawyer on your side. Talk to an attorney at The Federal Practice Group today and secure a lawyer who is devoted to military member defense!

Categories: Domestic Violence, Military Criminal Defense